The Spectacle of Critical Thought

The rambling thoughts pulled from the depths of my psyche that may or may not have been taken over by my id. That bastard.

theatlantic:

Dogs (and Cats) Can Love

Neurochemical research has shown that the hormone released when people are in love is released in animals in the same intimate circumstances.
Read more. [Image: tramod/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Dogs (and Cats) Can Love

Neurochemical research has shown that the hormone released when people are in love is released in animals in the same intimate circumstances.

Read more. [Image: tramod/Flickr]

(Source: lux-envy, via ratsoff)

ourtimeorg:

Preach!

ourtimeorg:

Preach!

“The rage of the oppressed is never the same as the rage of the privileged.”

—   

bell hooks (via smallbodies)

To all “egalitarians”

(via earthmoonlotus)

(Source: esteemsters, via newwavefeminism)

theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.
How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.
Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.
"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.
Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]

theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.

How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.

Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.

"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.

Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]

apartmenttherapy:

(via 25 DIY Projects for Small Bedrooms | Apartment Therapy)


Mainly reposting this for the link

deservemore:

BABY

(Source: calithepug)

This is everything.

This is everything.

(Source: sweetcribs, via designedinteriors)