The Spectacle of Critical Thought

The rambling thoughts pulled from the depths of my psyche that may or may not have been taken over by my id. That bastard.

wire-man:

silent-tundra:

jedavu:

Amazing Face-Paintings Transform Models Into The 2D Works Of Famous Artists

by  Valeriya Kutsan

If this isn’t the tightest shit you’ve seen then get the hell out of my face.

I’ve reblogged this before, so I’m doing it again.

(via ballsdeepinfeminism)

We were lied to. The women of my generation were told that we could ‘have it all’, as long as ‘it all’ was marriage, babies and a career in finance, a cupboard full of beautiful shoes and terminal exhaustion – and even that is only an option if we’re rich, white, straight and well behaved. These perfect lives would necessarily rely on an army of nannies and care-workers, and nobody has yet bothered to ask whether they can have it all.

We can have everything we want as long as what we want is a life spent searching for exhausting work that doesn’t pay enough, shopping for things we don’t need and sticking to a set of social and sexual rules that turn out, once you plough through the layers of trash and adverts, to be as rigid as ever.

As for young men, they were told they lived in a brave new world of economic and sexual opportunity, and if they felt angry or afraid, if they felt constrained or bewildered by contradictory expectations, by the pressure to act masculine, make money, demonstrate dominance and fuck a lot of pretty women while remaining a decent human being, then their distress was the fault of women and minorities. It was these grasping women, these homosexuals and people of colour who had taken away the power and satisfaction that was once their birthright as men. We were taught, all of us, that if we were dissatisfied, it was our fault, or the fault of those closest to us. We were built wrong, somehow. We had failed to adjust. If we showed any sort of distress, we probably needed to be medicated or incarcerated, depending on our social status. There are supposed to be no structural problems, just individual maladaption.

“…curious way that my idealism has been mixed with my fatalism, so that I can possess the soul of a dreamer and that of a cynic at the same time.”

—   Anaïs Nin  (via thelostdeer)

(Source: whyallcaps, via booklover)

maudelynn:

How to spend a Sunday Morning ~
via http://returntoloveliness.blogspot.com

maudelynn:

How to spend a Sunday Morning ~

via http://returntoloveliness.blogspot.com

(Source: maudelynn.tumblr.com , via booklover)

“When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’
It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions?”

designedinteriors:

designedinteriors | http://japanesetrash.com

Don’t leave me alone in here! ~ a Buddhist's thoughts on Smartphone addiction

dancingdakini:

blossomsofwisdom:

kadampalife:

Society today could do with some meditation!

Science journal recently published a sobering study that has not surprisingly created a stir in the psychology and neuroscience communities. Get this:

“In 11 experiments involving more than 700 people, the majority of participants reported that they found it unpleasant to be alone in a room with their thoughts for just 6 to 15 minutes.”

6 to 15 minutes?! Apparently they reached for their Smartphones after only a couple of those minutes and, when these were denied them, they even administered themselves electric shocks — anything to stop themselves from being left alone with their own minds.

It’s true that people hate waiting in line, at airports, for friends, in traffic, in doctor’s offices, etc. What did we do in the old days, before we had our gadgets?

The study said people found it “unpleasant” because a lot of their thoughts were unpleasant or negative. There’s a lot of unprocessed sadness, loss, sorrow about. Louis CK does a very good riff on this in this video, worth a watch:

Extract: “Sometimes when things clear away and you’re not watching anything and you’re in your car and you start going, oh no, here it comes, that I’m alone, and it starts to visit on you, just this sadness,” he said. “And that’s why we text and drive.”

He describes sitting through his sadness one day, and coming out the other side actually happier, accompanied by a Bruce Springsteen song. Ironically, the day before seeing this video I was listening to “Philadelphia” and had a similar experience of a loss coming up and then subsiding, good old Bruce. You know how people say, “It’s okay to be sad”? There is truth in that. (As long as we are not identifying with the sadness, though – see below). If we let ourselves experience our thoughts, we see that they are not as scary as they seemed while they were still lurking in the shadows. The more we understand what our mind actually is — a clear formless awareness that is naturally peaceful — the more we realize that the passing shadows of clouds can in no way affect its spaciousness and natural freedom.

I love the conclusion of this article.

I think we as a society are trying to numb our pain and run away from our problems, but avoidance doesn’t work. As long we keep doing this, we will remain unhappy.

jackieinct:

Expose: Shedding Light on Collective Beauty by Laura K Photography

Found these pictures through The Militant Baker’s website. Through each picture you can see women as they actually are and every single one of them is beautiful. 

(Source: jackievinct, via ballsdeepinfeminism)

persona-nongrata:

No matter what anyone tries to tell you, there is no such thing as positive groupthink.

(via thatlitsite)

digg:

BREAKING: DISNEYLAND NO LONGER HAPPIEST PLACE ON EARTH

(via littlekyle)